Physical Therapy

Blogs about Physical Therapy
Back to Blogs

Men's Health Spotlight: Non-Painful Sexual Dysfunction

June is Men’s Health Month. In the past, our blog has featured articles on men’s sexual health that have mostly focused on pain with sexual interactions. However, what if you don’t have pain with sexual interactions, but you are left troubled or dissatisfied following sex and/or intimacy? Would this issue be categorized as a sexual dysfunction?

Read More

Why is My Belly Bulging or Pooching Out in the Middle? It Sort of Looks Like I’m Still Pregnant.

Are you frustrated with trying to get your pre-baby body back? Are you seeing your belly bulge out when you do abdominal exercises or even when you just sit up? Are you nervous and feel like you can’t start exercising because you don’t want to make the bulge worse, have back pain, urinary leakage or just don’t know where to start? If this at all sounds familiar, you may be experiencing symptoms of something called diastasis recti (DR).

Read More

How Can Suspended Push-Ups Relieve Low Back Pain?

Two physical therapy studies here suggest push-ups in Redcord suspension slings are superior to ground based push-ups for improving function of the lumbar muscles. Low back pain patients responded well to this type of muscle activation.

Read More

What Can a Functional Movement Assessment Do For You?

The SFMA is something I now use every day in my practice, and with every single patient. It is a systematic process of looking at the body as a whole to find the primary source of movement dysfunction and pain. Interestingly, the source of dysfunction is often not at the site where clients actually experience their symptoms.

Read More

What's the Secret to a Pain-Free Backbend? 3 Tips from a Physical Therapist

I can't claim to be an expert yogi, but I have been practicing for over a year with a fantastic instructor (shout out to Joanna Wilson). Yoga has added much value to my life. As a physical therapist and former Division 1 softball player, most of my fitness has come in the more standard forms of weight lifting and running. I also did some Pilates to build core strength and coordination after sustaining an injury of my own.

Read More

What is Pelvic Health Physical Therapy? Going Beyond the Pelvic Floor.

Pelvic health isn't a new type of physical therapy, however it is finally gaining some traction in the health and wellness industry. Physicians are now realizing that it’s not just for pregnant and postpartum moms. Pelvic health is for people of all genders, ages, and activity levels. Everyone has a pelvis, and therefore we all could benefit from better pelvic health. So let's discuss what pelvic health physical therapy actually is and how it can help you.

Read More

What Can Princeton University Athletics Learn From Activcore?

Michelle Cesan, former Princeton University Field Hockey Player and member of the USA National Field Hockey Team, had been dealing with back issues for over a year. She reported, “Though I was able to get temporary relief through heat, massage and chiropractic means, nothing lasted more than a day.” Her coaches, trainers and doctors were unsure of the root cause of her symptoms, since both the MRI and bone scan were negative. Michelle was beginning to think she would have to live with the pain. That was until an Athletic Trainer from Princeton University recommended Activcore.

Read More

Wendy's Story: Running Injury and Hip Pain

This is an inspiring story of how Dr. Lance Frank, a physical therapist at Activcore, helped Wendy overcome a hip injury and got her back to running pain-free through the practice of physical therapy.

Read More

The Popping and Clicking Jaw. When Is It a Problem?

Like most joints, things pop, click, grind, and tell us we’re still alive! The jaw joint or TMJ (Temporomandibular Joint) is no different. It may start to make noises or feel differently when opening your mouth. But what are those noises? And when are they bad?

Read More

Squat Misconception #1: My Knees Should Never Go Past My Toes

Keeping the knees behind the imaginary vertical line of the toes is a cue frequently given when instructing someone to squat. This “over-cue” may be the result of certain biomechanical studies — showing compression forces on the patella-femoral joint with a knees forward approach — that have since been extrapolated to all populations. What may be at issue here is the suggestion of a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching the squat.

Read More

Sign Up for
Activcore Updates

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Search Activcore

Activcore Locations

Explore an Activcore location in your area.

Activcore Online (Telehealth)Atlanta, GeorgiaCUMMING, GEORGIADENVER, COLORADOGREENwood village, COLORADOPRINCETON, New JerseyScotch Plains, New Jersey
ACTIVCORE ONLINE (TELEHEALTH)
Atlanta
Georgia
CUMMING
GEORGIA
DENVER
COLORADO
Greenwood village
colorado
PRINCETON
New Jersey
Scotch Plains
New Jersey