The Activcore Blog

Dr. Ashlea Lytle, Physical Therapist and Pelvic Health Specialist at Activcore

Recent Posts

Mechanics For Vaginal Delivery:  Is There A Right Way To Push?

I recently gave birth to my 1st child and was blown away that no one actually prepared me for the 2nd stage of labor, aka pushing phase, 10 cm dilation to birth. My husband and I went to several classes to prepare us for our newborn. During these classes they discussed the stages of labor, what tools they could use during labor, reasons for a c-section, joys and challenges of pregnancy, and how to breathe during the first stage of labor to make it through contractions. When I actually went through my 2nd stage of labor, I realized no one ever discussed how to push and breathe during this phase. 

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How Can Physical Therapy Help With My Abdominal Pain?

There can be many reasons why someone has abdominal pain. Internal organs, such as your small intestine, colon, stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, uterus or ovaries, could be causing your symptoms. Or, the abdominal pain could be from a musculoskeletal condition, such as a nerve impingement from the spine, visceral fascial adhesions, strained muscles, or a dysfunctional pelvic floor. Seeing a physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor therapy can help determine if your pain is musculoskeletal in nature or if you need to be referred to a different specialist like a gastroenterologist.

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How Can Physical Therapy Help My Child with Bedwetting and Daytime Incontinence

Are your kids still having accidents at night? Are they peeing their pants at school? Do they feel embarrassed? Are they missing out on social activities? Urinary incontinence could be normal for their age but there does come a time when children should be dry during both the day and night. A physical therapist who specializes in pediatric pelvic health can determine why they're still having accidents and how to help.

Pediatric pelvic health is an area of specialty within the field of physical therapy. It is not a significant part of a physical therapist’s education. Rather, it is a specialization requiring much further study, training and practice following graduation from PT school. A pediatric pelvic health specialist holds both a degree in physical therapy as well as advanced credentials in the assessment and treatment of children with diagnoses that involve the pelvic floor musculature. Having this additional knowledge gives the physical therapist an even greater understanding of how to help your child from head to toe.

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