The Activcore Blog

You need Algebra before Calculus (for quality movement). Do You Have the Prerequisites?

As a physical therapist, I spend a large part of my time educating clients on their bodies. I'm not talking about the body they saw in a magazine, or the body they had 20 years ago. Rather, I educate them about the body they walk in with. 

When attempting to figure out a body’s movement history and how we’re going to change the direction of the story, it’s important that my explanation makes sense to them. Otherwise there will be minimal to no follow through after they leave my office. Without a true understanding of the “why” and how it relates to function, no amount of printed off exercise programs will have an impact on helping someone move better and without pain. Maybe it's my psychology major or my love for creating associations and images with words, but I often teach by creating a funny visual, alliteration, metaphor, or motto.

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I'm Getting Back into Running. How Can I Improve my Form?

Posted by Dr. Alyssa Wagner, Physical Therapist at Activcore on March 14, 2020 at 5:03 PM

Whether you are a former runner, a seasoned runner, or just beginning, how you are running is important. I don’t know about you, but until recently I was just lacing up my sneakers and running out the door. I never thought much about the way I was running, just how many miles I was going to do and how fast I could get them done. Your running form is just as important to your training as mileage, duration, and intensity. A few variables that can have a big impact on your performance include a proper warm-up, cadence, and shoe wear.

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How Can A Physical Therapist Help My Tennis Game?

As a tennis player, whether you’ve been spending the winter season playing indoor tennis, paddle tennis, pickleball, running, skiing, or just binge watching shows on Netflix — it’s now time in Colorado to get ready for the outdoor tennis season. 

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How Did We Help Two Professional Sports Teams Become Champions?

Posted by Tyler Joyce, Co-Founder and Physical Therapist at Activcore on February 21, 2020 at 3:41 PM

Let me start right off by saying that I’m not one to call attention to myself, or to toot my own horn. In fact, I've been known to not even tell my co-workers that it’s my birthday. This should give you an idea of how difficult it is for me to write about one of the best kept secrets in professional sports. But I simply cannot hold back this information any longer. It's not about boasting; rather it's about educating and helping others. After all, that's why I became a physical therapist in the first place.

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Why Do I Hurt When In Chaturanga (Low Plank) Pose?

So you’ve gone to your first beginner yoga class. Or maybe you just got a Peloton and did their 30-minute Vinyasa flow. Or perhaps you’ve been practicing Ashtanga for years but something changed recently. I hear from yogis at all levels that something about their chaturanga is painful. Although many people begin yoga in hopes of improving their flexibility, there is also a lot of strength required in yoga practice. Chaturanga is a particularly challenging pose requiring significant muscular support to perform it correctly. Yet, it is one of the first moves you learn in many yoga practices.

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I Already Go To The Gym. What Can A Physical Therapist Do For Me?

Posted by Dr. Alyssa Wagner, Physical Therapist at Activcore on February 2, 2020 at 5:15 PM

The health and wellness industry has been receiving the attention and value it deserves over the last few decades. Whether we're talking about the hottest new workout, latest self-care trend, or coolest fitness gadget to add to our gym bag, the topic of health and wellness is on the forefront of everyone's minds. Therefore, it should come to no surprise that, as a physical therapist, I support an active lifestyle for myself and for my clients.

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A Physical Therapist's Journey Back To Natural Movement, Step 1:  The Plan

Posted by Dr. Bryan Lynd, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 27, 2020 at 5:51 PM

With the start of a new calendar year, many people set new year resolutions or goals. I have chosen to set a physical performance goal for myself. This year I want to successfully do a strict “muscle up” by June. The reason for this goal has to do with my enrollment in a MovNat level 2 certification course coming up in July. MovNat (short for Move Naturally) applies primal movement patterns, such as crawling, squatting, jumping and climbing, to explore our body’s full range of motion and agility potential — so that we can rebuild how we move from the ground up.

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If I've Sustained A Concussion, Should I Be Concerned About Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?

Posted by Dr. Nick Passe, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 21, 2020 at 12:56 PM

Have you ever had a concussion? Even if you haven’t, chances are you've heard the term CTE. But what do we really know about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy? Is this something you should worry about if you've had a concussion?

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How Can A Physical Therapist Prepare Me For Performance Training?

Posted by Activcore Physical Therapy & Performance on January 13, 2020 at 5:35 PM

Before starting a performance training program, it’s always best to go through the proper evaluations and preparations with a qualified movement expert, such as a physical therapist.

Whether you plan to lift weights, run on a treadmill, or play a sport, you should make sure your body is capable of properly performing these movements. You should also know when and how much to increase the resistance, intensity, repetitions and frequency of the desired physical activity.

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Squat Misconception #2:  Deep Squats are Bad for the Knees

The squat as a foundational movement pattern and exercise is becoming more of a staple movement in physical rehabilitation, fitness and sports performance training. As this type of exercise gains in popularity, we should take a look at not only its benefits, but also its safety.

In my two previous blog posts about squatting, I presented the case that squats are safe and highly effective for building functional strength, and that your knees are allowed to travel past your toes as long as it's not to initiate the squatting movement. So, are deep squats bad for your knees?

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