The Activcore Blog

You need Algebra before Calculus (for quality movement). Do You Have the Prerequisites?

As a physical therapist, I spend a large part of my time educating clients on their bodies. I'm not talking about the body they saw in a magazine, or the body they had 20 years ago. Rather, I educate them about the body they walk in with. 

When attempting to figure out a body’s movement history and how we’re going to change the direction of the story, it’s important that my explanation makes sense to them. Otherwise there will be minimal to no follow through after they leave my office. Without a true understanding of the “why” and how it relates to function, no amount of printed off exercise programs will have an impact on helping someone move better and without pain. Maybe it's my psychology major or my love for creating associations and images with words, but I often teach by creating a funny visual, alliteration, metaphor, or motto.

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How Do I Advance my Yoga Practice to get Stronger and More Flexible?

Yoga is a centuries old practice but oftentimes, teachers have not adapted the style of teaching to reflect the demands of modern day life. If we take a critical lens to the demands of the modern worker, we see more sitting, phone use, and overall sedentary lifestyle than ever before. These prolonged postures have an effect on our muscles and posture in a way that we may not be aware of when we walk into a yoga class. 

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12 Tips to Stay Healthy and Fit While at Home

Posted by Activcore Physical Therapy & Performance on April 1, 2020 at 12:36 AM

Are you going stir crazy at home during this COVID-19 pandemic? We recommend these tips and measures to keep you going strong, and to prepare your body for other, more strenuous physical activities. Consult with your physical therapist or physician prior to beginning any new training program. Use common sense and do not exercise if you are feeling ill or experiencing pain.

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Why Do I Feel Unbalanced? Postural Restoration Explained.

Many new clients come in shifted... their squat looks crooked... or they've got a longer stride on one side when running.

So how did they get these imbalances? Oftentimes the logical explanation is that they're simply over-exposing themselves to certain environments such as:

  • Spending too much time doing one thing
  • Sitting at a desk with the mouse in one's right hand
  • Having an untreated injury
  • Playing one-sided sports like golf, sweep rowing, archery or pitching baseballs

When activities are biased towards one side, you may be disrupting the "balanced asymmetry" of the body. Yes, that's correct — we are all naturally asymmetrical.

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Why Do I Hurt When In Chaturanga (Low Plank) Pose?

So you’ve gone to your first beginner yoga class. Or maybe you just got a Peloton and did their 30-minute Vinyasa flow. Or perhaps you’ve been practicing Ashtanga for years but something changed recently. I hear from yogis at all levels that something about their chaturanga is painful. Although many people begin yoga in hopes of improving their flexibility, there is also a lot of strength required in yoga practice. Chaturanga is a particularly challenging pose requiring significant muscular support to perform it correctly. Yet, it is one of the first moves you learn in many yoga practices.

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What's the Secret to a Pain-Free Backbend? 3 Tips from a Physical Therapist

I can't claim to be an expert yogi, but I have been practicing for over a year with a fantastic instructor (shout out to Joanna Wilson). Yoga has added much value to my life. As a physical therapist and former Division 1 softball player, most of my fitness has come in the more standard forms of weight lifting and running. I also did some Pilates to build core strength and coordination after sustaining an injury of my own.

I always shied away from yoga because I didn't think I was flexible or graceful enough. But, when I started seeing clients for pain they developed in their yoga practice, I had to better understand how they were pushing themselves, and what they were experiencing in their bodies. I also had to find out why people were getting so excited to do a handstand! So I signed up for my first lesson.

Today, a year later I am still at it. After countless hours of training, I can fully appreciate the simultaneous strength, flexibility and balance required for yoga practice. This was something that was lacking from my previous fitness routines.

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