Pregnancy

Blogs about Pregnancy
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I Had A Baby And Now I Am Leaking... Help Me!

You have probably heard some people say, “Oh it is normal to leak after having a baby, that is just what happens.” While it is common to experience leaking, this shouldn't become your new normal. As a physical therapist who specializes in pelvic health, I am trained to help new moms overcome incontinence. I also work with moms who have been dealing with bladder issues for many years.

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3 Simple Exercises to Start Immediately After Having A Baby

You crossed the finish line of your pregnancy journey! Three trimesters of hormone changes and muscles adapting to the changes of load while the baby gradually grows. But what about the "fourth trimester" or postpartum period? Typically our instructions are to rest and let the body recover for 6 weeks after having a baby. However, what if we included gentle exercises as part of that rest and recovery?

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Physical Therapy During Pregnancy

You may or may not have heard that you can see a physical therapist for prenatal care. The big question is, what can a pelvic floor physical therapist do for the prenatal population? A lot actually! Pelvic floor PT is not exclusive to the pelvic floor region during pregnancy. Below is a list of some of the things that a pelvic floor physical therapist can treat for an individual who is pregnant that are non-specific to the pelvic floor.

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When Can I See a Physical Therapist After Giving Birth?

Easy answer: as soon as you want! Generally we wait 6 weeks postpartum to begin pelvic floor physical therapy. However, this applies to assessing and treating the pelvic floor muscles only. There are other regions of the body (hips, spine, shoulders, etc.) that are affected during pregnancy and the birthing process which can affect your posture, strength, stability and mobility.

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What is a Diastasis Recti Abdominis and Can I Prevent It?

What is a diastasis? Most people know the diastasis as a separation of the rectus abdominis muscle. While this is not completely wrong, it is also not completely true either. A diastasis is actually a thinning of the linea alba which is a connective tissue sheath that lies in the middle of the abdominal wall and connects the abdominal muscles.

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Finding Your Pelvic Floor Muscles

Have you been hearing about the pelvic floor or pelvic health physical therapy, but aren’t sure exactly what the pelvic floor actually is? In this week’s video, Dr. Krystal guides you through a step-by-step process of identifying this group of muscles with visual aid and verbal cues.

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Get to Know Dr. Sarah Pucillo from Women’s Health Care Associates

I recently started offering pelvic health physical therapy services at our latest Activcore studio in Littleton, Colorado. It is located within a popular OB/GYN practice called Women’s Health Care Associates. This new venture has given me an opportunity to learn more about this amazing group of medical providers in the Denver area.

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3 Tips For Managing Diastasis Recti During Pregnancy

A diastasis recti (DR) occurs when the rectus abdominis, your 6-pack muscles, separate in the front of the body. This commonly occurs during pregnancy but can also be found in persons with stomach obesity. As the abdomen increases in size, it stretches the front abdominal wall leaving the linea alba (connective tissue between your abdominal muscles) vulnerable to separation.

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Understanding Endometriosis, More Than Just Painful Periods!

Did you know that endometriosis affects 1 out of 10 women during their reproductive years (usually between the ages of 15-49), or about 15% of women worldwide (endometriosis.org)? The symptoms of endometriosis are cyclical debilitating painful periods, but can progress to chronic pelvic and abdominal pain, pain with intercourse, potentially leading to infertility.

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Do I Have Pelvic Floor Dysfunction? How to Screen For This.

As a physical therapist who specializes in the pelvic floor, I can assess, diagnose, prevent and prescribe treatment of pelvic floor related conditions. These dysfunctions include urinary incontinence, bladder and bowel dysfunctions, sensory issues and pain around pelvis, pain with sex and other sexual related dysfunctions, pelvic organ prolapse, pregnancy and postpartum recovery and more.

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