The Activcore Blog

How Did We Help Two Professional Sports Teams Become Champions?

Posted by Tyler Joyce, Co-Founder and Physical Therapist at Activcore on February 21, 2020 at 3:41 PM

Let me start right off by saying that I’m not one to call attention to myself, or to toot my own horn. In fact, I've been known to not even tell my co-workers that it’s my birthday. This should give you an idea of how difficult it is for me to write about one of the best kept secrets in professional sports. But I simply cannot hold back this information any longer. It's not about boasting; rather it's about educating and helping others. After all, that's why I became a physical therapist in the first place.

READ ARTICLE

I Already Go To The Gym. What Can A Physical Therapist Do For Me?

Posted by Dr. Alyssa Wagner, Physical Therapist at Activcore on February 2, 2020 at 5:15 PM

The health and wellness industry has been receiving the attention and value it deserves over the last few decades. Whether we're talking about the hottest new workout, latest self-care trend, or coolest fitness gadget to add to our gym bag, the topic of health and wellness is on the forefront of everyone's minds. Therefore, it should come to no surprise that, as a physical therapist, I support an active lifestyle for myself and for my clients.

READ ARTICLE

Return to Running Postpartum, PART 2:  What Types of Stroller and Shoes Should I Use?

Running is a wonderful activity for a new or seasoned mom to burn off steam, get some aerobic exercise, and have time to yourself. However, there does come a time when running alone isn’t practical and you need to bring your little one with you. So you pull out that jogging stroller, tie up those running shoes, and start running down your block with baby in tow. Then you quickly realize this is a lot harder than you thought!

READ ARTICLE

If I've Sustained A Concussion, Should I Be Concerned About Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?

Posted by Dr. Nick Passe, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 21, 2020 at 12:56 PM

Have you ever had a concussion? Even if you haven’t, chances are you've heard the term CTE. But what do we really know about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy? Is this something you should worry about if you've had a concussion?

READ ARTICLE

What Is Happening Inside My Head During and After A Concussion?

Posted by Dr. Nick Passe, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 15, 2020 at 1:21 PM

Most people think that a concussion occurs when the brain comes in contact with the skull. However, this simply is not the case.

READ ARTICLE

How Can A Physical Therapist Prepare Me For Performance Training?

Posted by Activcore Physical Therapy & Performance on January 13, 2020 at 5:35 PM

Before starting a performance training program, it’s always best to go through the proper evaluations and preparations with a qualified movement expert, such as a physical therapist.

Whether you plan to lift weights, run on a treadmill, or play a sport, you should make sure your body is capable of properly performing these movements. You should also know when and how much to increase the resistance, intensity, repetitions and frequency of the desired physical activity.

READ ARTICLE

Squat Misconception #2:  Deep Squats are Bad for the Knees

The squat as a foundational movement pattern and exercise is becoming more of a staple movement in physical rehabilitation, fitness and sports performance training. As this type of exercise gains in popularity, we should take a look at not only its benefits, but also its safety.

In my two previous blog posts about squatting, I presented the case that squats are safe and highly effective for building functional strength, and that your knees are allowed to travel past your toes as long as it's not to initiate the squatting movement. So, are deep squats bad for your knees?

READ ARTICLE

How Do I Prepare My Body for Snowboarding and Skiing? Exercise Tips to Stay Injury Free This Season.

Posted by Dr. Alyssa Wagner, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 7, 2020 at 7:16 PM

It’s that time of year again for a lot of us here in Colorado when we dust off the ski boots, strap the snowboards to the roof, and head up to the mountains. Skiing and snowboarding both require a combination of strength, endurance, agility and balance to keep you upright as you head down the hill. Whether you’re a year-round weekend warrior or winter is your time to shine, here are a few essential training tips to keep in mind before hitting the slopes.

READ ARTICLE

How Can Kettlebells Help You Every Day? 4 Kettlebell Exercises Fully Explained.

Posted by Activcore Physical Therapy & Performance on January 2, 2020 at 11:47 PM

In a previous post, we discussed how kettlebells allow you to replicate many of the basic movements you make in everyday life. This type of strength training helps you re-establish natural movement patterns, learn how to handle unstable loads without thinking about it, and reduce the risk of injury.

In today's post, we'll look into four kettlebell exercises that can be applied to all walks of life, whether you’re a world-class athlete or you struggle to pick up a bag of groceries.

READ ARTICLE

Squat Misconception #1:  My Knees Should Never Go Past My Toes

In my previous blog post, Should I Be Doing Squats, I explained the benefits of training the fundamental movement pattern of squatting. When engaging in an exercise program, the way you move is vital for overall health and performance. Within the realm of your exercise techniques are the cues and instructions given by coaches, fitness trainers, physical therapists and physicians. You also have the interim reality of internet opinions weighing in. 

Keeping the knees behind the imaginary vertical line of the toes is a cue frequently given when instructing someone to squat. This “over-cue” may be the result of certain biomechanical studies — showing compression forces on the patella-femoral joint with a knees forward approach — that have since been extrapolated to all populations. What may be at issue here is the suggestion of a one-size-fits-all approach to teaching the squat.

READ ARTICLE