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Anatomy Made Simple: Inner Muscles Versus Outer Muscles

In my last blog post I talked about how to simplify explaining anatomy to clients by way of the myofascial system. Before we dig into each myofascial chain, I would like to discuss another simple concept that has also dramatically improved the way I treat and educate my clients.‍ The concept of inner muscles versus outer muscles was introduced by Anders Bergmark in 1989.

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Anatomy Made Simple: The Myofascial System

If you know me, you know that I love to simplify things especially when it comes to physical therapy. That’s why I love Redcord. It is a simple yet effective tool. Now don’t get me wrong, it looks intimidating with all of those ropes, slings and bungee cords. But once you learn how to use the equipment and understand the testing and clinical reasoning process (known as Redcord NEURAC), it makes treating people so much easier.

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3 Common Running Mistakes that Can Lead to Pain

As a Doctor of Physical Therapy with advanced education specifically in running biomechanics, I see some common running mistakes that contribute to low back pain, knee pain and/or ankle pain. The three that I see most often are overstriding, bounce, and compliance.

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What Can A Physical Therapist Do For Me As A Soccer Player?

In my previous post, I gave 5 tips for helping teenage athletes avoid anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Now I’m going to discuss specifically what a physical therapist can do for you. As a physical therapist and former competitive soccer player, one of my passions is working with teenage athletes to develop training plans to prevent the type of injury that affected my soccer career.

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5 Tips to Help Teenage Athletes Avoid ACL Injuries

I am passionate about helping people prevent and rehabilitate knee injuries. When I was 15 years old, I tore my anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) playing competitive soccer. This injury and the subsequent months of physical therapy inspired me to become a physical therapist.

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Integrating Physical Therapy and Fitness Training for Better Balance!

Balance is something often taken for granted until it is gone. Whether you suffer from a sudden physical injury or simply notice that things you used to do are getting harder over time, losing your balance can affect your quality of life. In some cases, it can even shorten your life.

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Suspect a Concussion? Know the FAQs

Over the last several years concussions have been gaining more attention in the sports realm and media. While there is a lot of new information out in the ether about how to treat a concussion; unfortunately, there is also a lot of out-dated advice available. If you think you’ve sustained a concussion from a sports injury, car accident, fall around your home or some other way, you will benefit from physical therapy to address your injury and any concussion symptoms you may be experiencing.

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As a New Mom, When is the Ideal Time to Start Running Again?

Although many articles commonly warn new moms that running too early postpartum can cause various complications and is not advised, this does not apply to every woman across the board. Every woman’s body is different and each will not only have a different recovery process, but also variations in their previous baseline of running prior to giving birth.

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Physical Therapy for Concussions

We've helped countless people recover from concussions. Here are some of the most common questions that we get on this topic.‍ When should I start physical therapy after sustaining a concussion? What can a physical therapist do to help me recover from a concussion? It’s been a long time since my concussion, can physical therapy still help?

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From Boxing to Breathing: The Many Functions of the Serratus Anterior Muscle

The serratus anterior is commonly referred to as the Boxer’s Muscle. It is a fan-shaped muscle that originates on the superolateral surfaces of ribs 1 to 8 (or even 9 in some people) at the lateral wall of the thorax, and inserts along the superior angle, medial border, and inferior angle of the scapula.‍ Given its anatomical location, origin and insertion, and extensive documentation, we know that the serratus anterior muscle is critical in healthy shoulder function.

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