The Activcore Blog

If I've Sustained A Concussion, Should I Be Concerned About Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?

Posted by Dr. Nick Passe, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 21, 2020 at 12:56 PM

Have you ever had a concussion? Even if you haven’t, chances are you've heard the term CTE. But what do we really know about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy? Is this something you should worry about if you've had a concussion?

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What Exercises Are Safe for My Pelvic Floor?

Exercising with pelvic floor dysfunction can be scary, whether you are a mom who just had a baby, a dad who is recovering from prostate cancer surgery, or a CrossFitter who began leaking urine during certain lifting exercises. Regardless, you want to lead a healthy, active and strong lifestyle, but instead you are fearful of making things worse. I’ve been there and I’ve treated many clients who have been there too. So let’s talk about how to approach an exercise feeling knowledgeable and empowered rather than unsure and uneasy.

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We're Not Just About Those Red Ropes. But They Sure Do Look Cool In Pictures.

I’ve heard so many clients of mine, Princeton locals, and physicians call this place Redcord. We’ve even had people call and insist they weren’t sure if they should come here because they were afraid of all the red ropes.

Well, I’m here to set the record straight. Our clinic name is Activcore. We are highly credentialed physical therapists and we do more than Redcord. As a doctor of physical therapy, I attended 4 years of college and 3 years of PT school to become licensed for what I do every day. I take continuing education courses to further my education and to maintain my license. And yes, while many of those courses taught me how to use the red ropes hanging from our ceiling, all of the other courses have nothing to do with Redcord.

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What Is Happening Inside My Head During and After A Concussion?

Posted by Dr. Nick Passe, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 15, 2020 at 1:21 PM

Most people think that a concussion occurs when the brain comes in contact with the skull. However, this simply is not the case.

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How Can A Physical Therapist Prepare Me For Performance Training?

Posted by Activcore Physical Therapy & Performance on January 13, 2020 at 5:35 PM

Before starting a performance training program, it’s always best to go through the proper evaluations and preparations with a qualified movement expert, such as a physical therapist.

Whether you plan to lift weights, run on a treadmill, or play a sport, you should make sure your body is capable of properly performing these movements. You should also know when and how much to increase the resistance, intensity, repetitions and frequency of the desired physical activity.

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Squat Misconception #2:  Deep Squats are Bad for the Knees

The squat as a foundational movement pattern and exercise is becoming more of a staple movement in physical rehabilitation, fitness and sports performance training. As this type of exercise gains in popularity, we should take a look at not only its benefits, but also its safety.

In my two previous blog posts about squatting, I presented the case that squats are safe and highly effective for building functional strength, and that your knees are allowed to travel past your toes as long as it's not to initiate the squatting movement. So, are deep squats bad for your knees?

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How Do I Prepare My Body for Snowboarding and Skiing? Exercise Tips to Stay Injury Free This Season.

Posted by Dr. Alyssa Wagner, Physical Therapist at Activcore on January 7, 2020 at 7:16 PM

It’s that time of year again for a lot of us here in Colorado when we dust off the ski boots, strap the snowboards to the roof, and head up to the mountains. Skiing and snowboarding both require a combination of strength, endurance, agility and balance to keep you upright as you head down the hill. Whether you’re a year-round weekend warrior or winter is your time to shine, here are a few essential training tips to keep in mind before hitting the slopes.

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How Can Kettlebells Help You Every Day? 4 Kettlebell Exercises Fully Explained.

Posted by Activcore Physical Therapy & Performance on January 2, 2020 at 11:47 PM

In a previous post, we discussed how kettlebells allow you to replicate many of the basic movements you make in everyday life. This type of strength training helps you re-establish natural movement patterns, learn how to handle unstable loads without thinking about it, and reduce the risk of injury.

In today's post, we'll look into four kettlebell exercises that can be applied to all walks of life, whether you’re a world-class athlete or you struggle to pick up a bag of groceries.

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I’m Backed Up and Bloated. How Can Physical Therapy Relieve My Constipation?

As much as we would like to avoid the topic, poop happens. Or in many uncomfortable cases, it doesn’t. According to the statistics, approximately 20% of adults between 40-75 have constipation. And those numbers are just the base level, run-of-the-mill, stopped-up versions. The actual numbers increase significantly with additional factors:

  • Older > Younger
  • Female > Male
  • Psychological factors (stress, anxiety)
  • Medication-induced

So, are you constipated? Many consider themselves not to be constipated if anything at all is coming out. However, the actual Rome IV definition (most recent consensus of the medical community - May 2016) may surprise you.

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Return to Running Postpartum, PART 1:  How Do I Get Back To Running After Having a Baby?

You just had a baby, or maybe your child is grown — and now you have a desire to take up or get back into running. First off, congratulations. Taking any step towards leading an active lifestyle is a wonderful thing. Running can have a positive effect on your mental, physical and emotional well being!

As both an orthopedic physical therapist and pelvic health specialist, I often get questions from clients about how and when they can get back to running after having a baby. However my answer isn't always cut and dry. There are many factors to consider when assessing readiness for return to running. For instance, whether you ran before your pregnancy or during your pregnancy, and whether you had any pregnancy problems or delivery complications should all weigh into this decision.

Oftentimes, moms either get back into running too fast, or worry they're not able to run postpartum and never even give it a try. Running postpartum can be a realistic goal, as it is totally attainable for many new and seasoned moms.

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